Archive for the ‘Hawaii career opportunities’ Category

Diana Ross and Other Milestones

June 10th, 2015

DING-DING-DING! One million and counting -- nope, didn't hit the Megabucks slots jackpot in Vegas, but saw my Career Changers TV YouTube Channel cross the one million views mark this past weekend. In an age when videos of cats jumping in boxes or people dancing around to pop hits easily surpass that number in a day, it still represents a big milestone for me because five years ago I wasn't sure my OC16 TV show would even last more than two or three episodes. Posting segments on YouTube was an afterthought. Now, we have subscribers from all over the world. People we featured have been contacted by producers of nationally-broadcast television shows for segments on the Food Network, Travel Channel and Discovery Channel because they saw those pieces on the CCTV YouTube Channel while Googling around for leads on Hawaii stories. You can see our latest videos by clicking here. But you should watch this month's episode on high def widescreen if possible to appreciate the beauty of the quilts that were on display at the Hawaii Quilt Guild Show last month. Just amazing.

As noted in my May 21 post about the end of the Dave Letterman era and Mad Men show, I've been in a New York state of mind (love that Billy Joel song). With Diana Ross coming here to perform this weekend, I had another flashback that reminds me how much things have changed in the past three decades since I left NYC. I was at her 1983 free concert in Central Park -- the one attended by more than 350,000 fans when it started raining, then turned to chaos as young black kids began snatching purses and knocking over stunned, mostly white people who had laid out picnic blankets and brought bottles of good wine and primo pot.

At the time, I lived on W. 89th Street a block from Central Park, where I shared the ground floor apartment of a brownstone with a time share law attorney, who traveled frequently... which meant I often had the large two-bedroom place to myself (brick walls, fireplace, small garden area in back). The Upper West Side was just starting to show signs of gentrification, so there was still a good mix of lower, middle and upper class incomes in that area. But if you went further uptown about 20 blocks or so, you'd find yourself in the heart of Harlem. Rarely did the twain meet in Central Park. Prior free concerts were for musicians like Simon & Garfunkel, who weren't big draws for young African-Americans in NYC, as you can probably imagine.

When all heck broke loose, I was in the vicinity of a group of young preppy types who were distraught and shook up. Two of the girls had their pocketbooks stolen, the guys got punched, they were soaking wet from the sudden downpour, and they needed help. I took them back to my apartment, where they were able to dry off, make phone calls and compose themselves. Turned out they had summer jobs in the Hamptons, where wealthy New Yorkers and the jet set vacation or own second homes. Part of the Hamptons was also a hot spot for gays to hang out during the summer season, as I learned from my boss at a publishing company in Greenwich Village.

The preppy group I rescued were grateful and invited me to stop at the restaurant they worked in if I ever got out to the Hamptons. That didn't seem likely, until my boss -- who was gay and diagnosed with AIDS -- asked me if I'd like to go with him one weekend to his beach house. He wasn't interested in me that way, and he knew I was straight. But his boyfriend was living abroad, he was lonely, scared and knew I liked to party hard -- and that's what people did in the Hamptons. He collected vintage Thunderbirds too, and had a couple at his Hamptons place. We stopped at the restaurant where the preppy kids worked, and they were surprised to see me. I don't know if it was seeing me with Marc (not all gays are obvious in their orientation -- he was though) but instead of greeting me with open arms, they were a bit stand-offish. They didn't offer to show me around town or meet up with me later.

At Marc's beach house, he had disposable plastic utensils, paper plates and cups for me to use because he knew straight people were afraid of catching AIDS from gays, infected with HIV or not. He also had Kaposi's sarcoma, a type of cancer that leads to telltale purplish lesions on the skin. Maybe the preppy kids noticed that when he and I sat down at the restaurant table for lunch. In some ways, being with him was like hanging out with a leper and trying to act like everything was normal while knowing that person was going to die soon. That night, I went to a bar by myself, got very drunk, then took a cab back to his place. He smiled as I attempted to tell him how sad it was for me to see him like this. I started crying, and we hugged. I was too smashed to be afraid of getting the "gay disease" through physical contact. He was just a human being who was dying and all alone. Marc passed away not long after that weekend.

The other lasting memory connected to that Diana Ross concert was what transpired a day or two later in the jazz joint I regularly visited after work. I had become good friends with the bartender, Lee Dobson,  a talented actor who never got that big break to launch his stage or screen career. He was black, smart, funny and we used to joke that I was his "Samurai Brother" after he found out that I was half-Japanese. Most of my friends at the Seventh Avenue South jazz club were black, and when race came up, it was usually joking around about the differences between whites and blacks  -- how we danced, dressed, talked. Jazz music was our common language though.

Anyway, the topic of the Diana Ross concert came up and I told Lee how terrible it was "those animals" came down from Harlem and ruined everything, or something to that effect. There was a look of pain and hurt in Lee's eyes that I will never forget. I didn't consider myself prejudiced, but yes, I had to acknowledge that I viewed blacks from above 125th Street differently than the blacks I knew at Seventh Avenue South. Lee felt things were blown out of proportion because the kids were black -- and he was probably right. Words like "mobs" and "riots" were thrown around by the media, and even myself afterwards. He tried to get me to see things through their eyes -- the have-nots on the outskirts of affluence, watching the wine and cheese set take the best spots in front of the concert stage while they had to push and shove their way through the crowds just to get a glimpse of Diana.

Today, we have an African-American President and I live down the street from the beach the Obama family has stayed at for their Christmas vacations. We've seen attitudes about gays and gay marriage progress a great deal in recent years throughout the country. It's a long way from Central Park and that summer weekend trip to the Hamptons... but there's still too much prejudice, racism and intolerance in the world. New York taught me how to deal with it. Hawaii has shown me that we can do better.

McKinley Books and Music Sale This Weekend

January 16th, 2015

Friends of the Library of Hawaii is holding a three-day sale of more than 40,000 records/CDs and over 10,000 gently-used books to help support literary and public libraries throughout the islands. It will be in the McKinley High School cafeteria at 1039 S. King Street, from 9 AM until 3 PM on Sat., Jan. 17 and Sun., Jan. 18. On Martin Luther King Day, Mon., Jan. 19, they'll wrap up sales between 9 AM and 1 PM. Collectors are already planning to line up early to get first crack at possibly finding rare albums and books. Kudos to all the Friends volunteers and the Hawaii State Federal Credit Union for putting together this event!


Haven't been posting lately because my 27-inch iMac, which I love, was in the shop for a week. Mac Made Easy in Kailua diagnosed the problem and had to order a video graphics card from Texas because it's a 2009 model. Not sure if the Apple Store at Ala Moana could have fixed it sooner, but I didn't want to drive to the other side and have to lug my large screen iMac through the mall crowds. I could imagine some shopper with their eyes fixated on a cell phone walking right into me and sending my machine crashing to the ground. In Kailua, I just have to watch out for Japanese tourists on bikes crossing my path.

When I got my "old" iMac back, it was like seeing my wife after she had been gone for awhile... well, maybe not quite that emotional. But I really did miss my computer and couldn't get into writing on my tiny back-up laptop or iPad. At first, the repaired iMac seemed fine. Then a little later I noticed the right half of the screen was darker, as if covered by a shadow. I fiddled with the brightness control, moved it around, and it remained dimmer on one side. I Googled the problem, and it turns out many iMac owners reported the same glitch. They complained that Apple would not admit it was a known issue related to the 27-inch screens and was charging about $500 to repair it if not covered by warranty... which always seem to expire just before your computer goes on the fritz. In the future, I'll have to get the extended Apple Care plan I think. Sigh.

Anyhow, after shutting down the computer and rebooting, the dimming has lessened and is barely detectable. Yet it makes me wonder if Apple's famed quality control has been slipping the past couple of years. Anyone have thoughts on that?


This month's Career Changers TV episode happens to be related to computers and business education programs. We've partnered with DevLeague, a coding bootcamp, to promote what I believe is a great alternative to 4-year college computer science programs. I'm a proponent of getting a well-rounded liberal arts education -- if you can afford it, and aren't sure what you want to do for a career, that is.

But if you're interested in website design, building apps for smart devices, or becoming a startup entrepreneur in the high tech field, what you really need to know is computer coding. Nothing beats hands-on experience and small classes with guidance from professionals who know what companies are looking for in programmers and website developers. DevLeague does exactly that, and to date, they say all of their graduates have succeeded in finding employment after completing the bootcamp or their longer 24-week "part-time" program (still pretty intensive though!).

You can see that video segment on the CCTV YouTube Channel or by clicking here.

Also, we've got a sponsored story about Remington College's new Business Administration program. They consulted with local companies, big and small, who are part of their Program Advisory Committees, and revamped the biz courses into three tracks that address the needs of potential employers in Hawaii.  Their instructors have MBAs and solid real world work experience themselves -- stuff you can't learn just from text books. Here's the link to that piece.

For daily viewing times of my show, visit www.CareerChangers.TV. Have a great weekend -- and check out the McKinley Book & Music Sale if you're out and about!

Healing Hands for Arthritis Day at Massage Envy

September 10th, 2014

National Sponsors - Arthritis Foundation

On Weds., Sept. 17 from 8AM until they close at 10PM, Massage Envy Hawaii in Kaneohe and Pearl Highlands will donate $10 from every appointment to Arthritis Foundation Hawaii. Last year, the national Massage Envy franchises raised over a million dollars, according to Nate McFarland, co-owner of the local spas. We featured Nate and his business partner, Lari Jarvis, on my Career Changers TV show recently and he mentioned they were planning to expand to Kapolei in the near future. (Click here to see that segment.)

Well, they've signed the Kapolei lease and Nate says they plan on opening early next year in January or February 2015. It will be their largest spa to date with 14 rooms, plus a "Quiet Room" for relaxation, and will be employing about 20 more licensed massage therapists -- which is why we did a story on them in the first place. One of my show's sponsors is Remington College, and many graduates from their Honolulu massage therapy program were hired to open the first two Massage Envy locations on Oahu. (Here's the Massage Envy testimonial piece about Remington.)

If you watch the videos, you'll see that Nate and Lari have a real passion for what they're doing even though neither of them had any background in the highly competitive massage spa business. Yet in their very first year, the Pearl spa was the fastest growing Massage Envy franchise ever -- and there are over 900 of them throughout the country. But Nate says they will take their time before adding more spas on Oahu or the Neighbor Islands because he wants to do it right. That means making sure their employees also reap the benefits from their success.

But when he called, it wasn't to talk about the Kapolei news or how well their business was doing. He just wanted people to know about Healing Hands for Arthritis Day, and hopes they can totally book up the Kaneohe and Pearl Highlands spas to raise money for this worthy charity event. You can visit their website to find out more about Massage Envy hours and rates.


More 'Bows Woes

On an unrelated note, my wife and I suffered through a terrible first half of football at last week's UH loss to Oregon State. Although special teams and the defense made the final score much closer, the offensive woes left us wondering if the current starting quarterback and receivers can get the job done. We knew Joey Iosefa could carry the load for short yards on running plays... and then he got injured, taking out the most effective part of the offense so far this season.

Here's the thing I don't get: why was Iosefa even on the field for that fourth and long play? He's not the type of back that catches passes down field or is expected to be a breakaway threat, which is generally what you want in passing situations. So Woolsey winds up dumping a short pass to him that had virtually no chance of picking up enough yards for a first down, and they lose Iosefa for at least 4 to 6 weeks. Sure, freak injuries can happen on any play or even in practice. But it was another instance that makes you question what the coaches are thinking and how they use their personnel.

I had a bad feeling about that game the moment I saw the team come out in those funeral black uniforms. Yes, when June first turned the Rainbows into the "H" Warriors, the tough guy all-black look was in vogue. But it's passe. Oregon's flashy uniforms showed that teams can wear any color if they play like they own it. This UH team hasn't really created their own identity yet. The closest they've come under Coach Chow was when they wore the retro Bows uniforms with the brighter shade of green, and displayed some of that old school grit longtime fans were used to seeing back in the day.

One thing I wish wasn't old school though is the halftime UH marching band show. Really, tributes to Elvis in the year 2014? Sigh.


This month's Career Changers TV episode features inspirational stories about Seed Restaurant in Kaimuki, along with segments about the Hawaii Small Business Fair and Cynthia Yamasaki, a leadership and life coach. You can find daily viewing times at www.CareerChangers.TV or watch segments from past and current shows on the CCTV YouTube Channel, which now has over 600,000 views. If you'd like to advertise on our show, drop me an email or give me a call at (808) 262-5073!

Seeds of Hope

September 3rd, 2014

PROGRAM ALERT: The new September episode of Career Changers TV premieres Thurs., 7:30 PM on OC16 (channel 12/high def 1012). For daily viewing times, please visit www.CareerChangers.TV. You can also watch segments from past and current shows on the CCTV YouTube Channel, which now has over half a million views!

August was crazy busy for me so I didn't have time to weigh in on the elections (no surprise Neil got trounced -- I've written in this blog that right after he got elected, he and his "team" promptly alienated supporters by ignoring them), Kawainui Marsh plans (I live next to the marsh and can tell you the same objections being raised now were raised over 10 years ago by residents -- and ignored by the bureaucrats who get paid to do these pie-in-the-sky fantasy park plans), or UH athletics/football problems (again, same old obstacles ignored by the State Legislature and public at large).

And yet, my latest show is about people who are doing positive things without government help or involvement! What started as a short feel-good piece on Seed Restaurant in Kaimuki, near Big City Diner, grew into something much bigger once I started talking to the couple behind the venture. I was a bit leery when I first read that it was affiliated with a religious ministry because I consider myself an agnostic and have issues with organized religions in general. However, Jordan and Sonya Seng, the couple behind Seed and Bluewater Mission in Palama Settlement are... well, different than what you might expect. They met at Stanford University. His background was in academia -- he wound up at Harvard, writing papers on nuclear proliferation/WMDs and warned about meddling in the Middle East back in 2001 before we invaded Iraq (his analysis was quite prescient). She studied music, sang professionally  (Jordan taught himself to play instruments so he could back her up) and acted in commercials, TV shows, musical theater productions. Jordan's stories about growing up on the run with his fugitive father is pretty incredible too.

None of that stuff is in the two-parter we're running this month. I'm saving their personal back story for a future show because I want people to hear why they started Seed Restaurant and understand that this is how change happens. They had no experience whatsoever in the restaurant biz. But they were trying to help the homeless, survivors of domestic abuse, sex trafficking and prostitution, ex cons... people who have largely been left to fend for themselves without the tools or resources to rebuild their lives. And here they are half a year later, with a thriving restaurant that sticks to their core principles of "justice." They are accomplishing more with far less money than city, state and federal agencies have spent on countless studies and pilot programs. Yes, it's on a small scale -- but that's how you tackle big problems: one person, one step at a time. I love what they're doing. Check out my show, and I think you'll be impressed too. Maybe even moved, like I was.


Speaking of tackling, I have to get in some last licks about the UH home opener against Washington. Months ago when it was announced season tickets were at an all-time low, I used that opportunity to upgrade our seats at a decent price. We've been there at Aloha Stadium, rain or shine, win or lose, and stuck with them through the tough times, which made the winning seasons even more special. When Ben Jay commented that football might be dropped, I knew he was talking about a hypothetical scenario set in the future -- not something imminent. But I hoped it would light a fire and make people realize you can't take things for granted. Sure enough, there was a much bigger crowd for the first game than was projected. And the stadium management blew it.

My wife and I got there around 2 PM for the 4:30 PM kick-off and we could already see the parking lots were nearly full. Traffic was backing up around the stadium. Hundreds of people waited hours to get into the lot, then waited in lines for tickets, or gave up and went home. Not a great way to entice fans to come out to future games. Inside the stadium, it was obvious the management expected the dire predictions of a small crowd. There were fewer concession stands open than we've ever seen at a UH football game, including during the Von Appen Era.

This is what negativity and pessimism does. It creates a self-fulfilling prophecy. The team is expected to be bad, so people won't come, so we'll plan on them not coming, and then when they come, we won't be ready to handle the crowd, so they'll have a bad experience... and then the future crowds will meet their initial low projections. Sheesh.

My one gripe about the UH effort on the field was a moment of indecision by the coaching staff during the first half of a tight game: fourth and one inside the Red Zone. The Bows had Washington on their heels. Joey Iosefa was plowing over people. We had already scored twice on the Huskies defense. Now, if this was Navy or Georgia Tech, which runs triple option, they don't hesitate. They line up with the QB under center. Sometimes they snap it quick. Other times they try to draw the defense offsides to get a "free" first down. If the defense doesn't bite on the hard count, they'll call a time-out or take a delay of game penalty, then kick the field goal.

So why didn't we at least try to draw Washington offside BEFORE calling the time out, instead of running a trick play AFTER the Huskies had a chance to regroup? That's also what I don't like about the shotgun in short yardage situations. It literally limits your options on running plays and takes away the QB sneak. Heck, even back when I played high school football, the quarterback and center always had an "automatic" tap on the butt play to snap the ball if there wasn't a defensive lineman covering the center. With a running QB like Woolsey, that should be part of the short yardage package.

Anyhow, I still liked that they went for it on fourth down instead of just settling for the field goal. Like the folks who started Seed Restaurant, sometimes you have to take chances and have faith in people to make things work.

Deadlines and Routines

August 6th, 2014

PROGRAM ALERT: The new August episode of Career Changers TV premieres Thurs., 7:30 PM on channel 12/high def 1012, and will feature the Pacific Aviation Museum -- plus a profile of Burl Burlingame, the former newspaper writer, who is also a book author, musician and now works as curator at the museum. There's also a preview of their upcoming Biggest Little Airshow on Aug. 16 and 17 at Ford Island! For daily viewing times, please visit www.CareerChangers.TV.

In my last blog post, I mentioned I'm a finalist in a national screenwriting competition that required the top 10 entries to complete a new script in about two months. Screenplays for feature movies average around 100 to 120 pages with each page representing about one minute of screen time. So cranking out 10-15 pages per week is pretty doable for most writers. The challenge though is writing good pages that will survive the inevitable edits, cuts, and rewriting that comes with producing a workable script. If you're writing a novel, you can wax poetic, spend time inside your characters' heads, describe locations in detail right down to the blades of grass or hue of the sky. Not so in screenplays, which have to move fast since Hollywood readers often make up their minds on whether they will read the script after just one or two pages. By page 10, many have already decided if it's a "pass" or "consider."

So I was churning out pages the first month, and thought they were pretty good. Except my story coach would pick apart scenes and prod me to develop the characters more in each of our weekly phone sessions, which is what makes this contest a unique experience for aspiring screenwriters. Script consultants like the one I'm working with charge as much as $75 per hour for their feedback (my sessions are free, courtesy of the contest); notes can range from a couple hundred bucks to a thousand or more. There are so many wannabe screenwriters/directors/filmmakers that a cottage industry has developed in L.A. to tap into that market, which generates 30,000 to 40,000 new scripts that are registered with the Writers Guild each year. Of those, less than five percent will even have a remote chance of being seriously looked at by industry players.

And this contest is one way to get to the top of the wannabes heap... if I win, that is. The problem is I was making up much of my new screenplay as I was going along, while dealing with the demands of producing my TV show and other video projects -- all on deadlines too. Then, after taking in what the story coach criticized or suggested, I'd go back and make changes that improved the script but put me behind schedule. My normal routines were thrown out of whack -- which can be a good thing. Sometimes we get stuck in ruts and do only as much as we're used to doing out of habit. We forget how much we're actually capable of accomplishing, unless we're pressed by outside forces.

With just one week left to turn in the first draft, I was at page 55 -- mid-point -- and had to write another 50 pages in seven days. To begin with, I'm not a fast writer by nature. Some of my prior scripts have taken years to complete or even start because I'd be carrying around ideas for a long time before the story kicked in. Also, I tend to procrastinate unless I'm faced with a deadline... which might be related to my early writing career as a news reporter back in New Jersey. Somewhere along the way, I got into a mindset that my normal routine was to do "x" amount of work per day to be finished on "y" to meet deadline "z" -- it's how I chunk out tasks and allot time to multiple projects I'm usually juggling.

But even for me, the prospect of crafting 50 plus script pages -- actually twice that since I know I'll delete half of what I write -- was daunting. Yet exciting too. Some days I woke at 4 AM to start work. My mind would keep writing even when I stopped to eat or watch TV before going to bed. I wasn't sure what direction the story was going in toward the end, and when I was stuck, my subconscious sometimes provided answers through the characters I had created. Somehow, I got the draft done and submitted it with a couple of hours to spare.

However, that was just the first deadline. A week later, I got back detailed notes from another reader/story analyst as part of the contest steps, and now have until Aug. 16 to turn in the final draft that will be possibly read by an A-list screenwriter and top management company in L.A. The notes were spot on and pinpointed story problems that were largely a result of making stuff up on the fly in the mad dash to the finish line for the first draft.

It's amazing how much we can do when we force ourselves to buckle down and deliver the best work we can do on a shorter timetable. Some people thrive on that kind of pressure. Others can't handle the stress of performing on demand. What's funny is when my wife and I are watching reality shows like Project Runway or Top Chef, there are always one or two competitors who seem so fragile and unable to cope with the time constraints, you wonder why they even wanted to be on the show in the first place! It's like that old saying, if you can't stand the heat, stay out of the kitchen -- but if you enjoy competing, seek out opportunities that will bring out the best in yourself.


To see video segments from past and current Career Changers TV episodes, check out the CCTV YouTube Channel -- now at over half a million views worldwide, and climbing!